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Monday, January 25, 2010

New IRS tax credit forms and instructions

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today released the new form that eligible homebuyers need to claim the first-time homebuyer credit this tax season and announced processing of those tax returns will begin in mid-February. The IRS also announced new documentation requirements to deter fraud related to the first-time homebuyer credit.
The new form and instructions follow major changes in November to the homebuyer credit by the Worker, Homeownership, and Business Assistance Act of 2009. The new law extended the credit to a broader range of home purchasers and added new documentation requirements to deter fraud and ensure taxpayers properly claim the credit.
With the release of Form 5405, First-Time Homebuyer Credit and Repayment of the Credit, and the related instructions, eligible homebuyers can now start to file their 2009 tax returns. Taxpayers claiming the homebuyer credit must file a paper tax return because of the added documentation requirements.
The IRS expects to start processing 2009 tax returns claiming the homebuyer credit in mid-February after it completes the updating and testing of systems to meet the law’s new requirements. The updates allow the IRS to put in place critical systemic checks to deter fraud related to the homebuyer credit.
Some of these early taxpayers claiming the homebuyer credit may see tax refunds take an additional two to three weeks.
In addition to filling out a Form 5405, all eligible homebuyers must include with their 2009 tax returns one of the following documents in order to receive the credit:
A copy of the settlement statement showing all parties' names and signatures, property address, sales price, and date of purchase. Normally, this is the properly executed Form HUD-1, Settlement Statement.
For mobile home purchasers who are unable to get a settlement statement, a copy of the executed retail sales contract showing all parties' names and signatures, property address, purchase price and date of purchase.
For a newly constructed home where a settlement statement is not available, a copy of the certificate of occupancy showing the owner’s name, property address and date of the certificate.
In addition, the new law allows a long-time resident of the same main home to claim the homebuyer credit if they purchase a new principal residence. To qualify, eligible taxpayers must show that they lived in their old homes for a five-consecutive-year period during the eight-year period ending on the purchase date of the new home. The IRS has stepped up compliance checks involving the homebuyer credit, and it encouraged homebuyers claiming this part of the credit to avoid refund delays by attaching documentation covering the five-consecutive-year period:
Form 1098, Mortgage Interest Statement, or substitute mortgage interest statements,
Property tax records or
Homeowner’s insurance records.
The IRS also reminded homebuyers that the new documentation requirements mean that taxpayers claiming the credit cannot file electronically and must file paper returns. Taxpayers can still use IRS Free File to prepare their returns, but the returns must be printed out and sent to the IRS, along with all required documentation.
Normally, it takes about four to eight weeks to get a refund claimed on a complete and accurate paper return where all required documents are attached. For those homebuyers filing early, the IRS expects the first refunds based on the homebuyer credit will be issued toward the end of March.
The IRS encourages taxpayers to use direct deposit to speed their refund. In addition, taxpayers can use Where's My Refund? on IRS.gov to track the status of their refund.
More details on claiming the credit can be found in the instructions to Form 5405, as well as on the First-Time Homebuyer Credit page on IRS.gov.

The National Association of Realtors

Updated Real Estate Foreclosure List

Click here to go to the foreclosure list.

For more information about these or any other property call East Tennessee Realty Group at 865.774.7764


Friday, January 1, 2010

Five mistakes that make house flipping a flop

Do your research and make sure you have what it takes before you try to turn a profit with real estate.

By Lisa Smith of Investopedia

Five mistakes that make house flipping a flop (© Myron Jay Dorf/Corbis)

more on Investopedia.com

·         7 tips on buying a home in a down market

·         6 tips on selling your home in a down market

·         Home renovations that don't pay

House flipping has become the day tradinghttp://images.intellitxt.com/ast/adTypes/2_bing_11pxw.gif of the 2000s. But in the rush to make a profit, far too many would-be real-estate moguls overlook the basics and end up failing. Here are the five biggest mistakes investors make in this market and how to avoid them.

1. Not enough money
Dabbling in real estate is an expensive proposition. The first expense is the property acquisition cost. While low- and no-money-down financing claims abound, finding these deals from a legitimate vendor is easier said than done. Also, if you're financing the acquisition, that means you're paying interest. Although the interest on borrowed money is tax deductible, it is not a 100% deduction. Every dollar spent on interest adds to the amount you will need to earn on the sale just to break even.

Paying cashhttp://images.intellitxt.com/ast/adTypes/2_bing_11pxw.gif eliminates the interest, but even then, there are costs to holding a property, such as taxes and utilities. Renovation costs must also be factored in. If you plan to fix the house up and sell it for a profit, the sale price must exceed the combined cost of acquiring the property, holding it and renovating it. Even if you overcome these hurdles, don't forget about capital gains taxes, which will chip away at your profit.

Read:  House flipping makes a comeback

2. Not enough time
Renovating and flipping houses is time-consuming. It can take months to find and buy the right property. Once you own the house, you'll need to invest time to fix it up. Before you can sell it, you'll need to schedule inspections to make sure the property complies with applicable building codes. If it doesn't, you need to spend more time and money to bring it up to par. Next, you'll need to invest time to sell the property. If you show it to prospective buyers yourself, you'll spend plenty of time commuting to and from the property and meeting with potential buyers.

If you are able to make a 10% profit on a house that cost $50,000, you'll make a $5,000 profit. For many people, it might make more sense to get a good job, where they can earn that kind of money in a few weeks or months via a steady paycheck -- with no risk and a consistent time commitment.


House-flipping tips for beginners

3. Not enough skills
Professional builders and skilled professionals, such as carpenters and plumbers, often flip houses as a sideline to their regular jobs. They have the knowledge, skills and experience to find and fix a house. Some of them also have union jobs that provide unemployment checks all winter long while they work on their side projects.

The real money in house flipping comes from sweat equity. If you're handy with a hammer, enjoy laying carpet, can hang drywall, roof a house and install a kitchen sink, you have the skills to flip a house. On the other hand, if you have to pay a professional to do all of this work, the odds of making a profit on your investment will be dramatically reduced.

House Flipping Back?

View more MSN videosGo to CNBC

4. Not enough knowledge
To be successful, you need to be able to pick the right property, in the right location, at the right price. In a neighborhood of $100,000 homes, do you really expect to buy at $60,000 and sell at $200,000? The market is far too efficient for that to occur frequently.

Even if you get the deal of a lifetime, you need to know which renovations to make and which to skip. You also need to understand the applicable tax laws and know when to cut your losses and get out before your project becomes a money pit.

5. Not enough patience
Professionals take their time and wait for the right property. Novices rush out and hire the first contractor that makes a bid to address work they can't do themselves. Professionals either do the work themselves or rely on a network of prearranged, reliable contractors.

Novices hire a real-estate agent to help sell the house. Professionals rely on "for sale by owner" efforts to minimize their costs and maximize profits. Novices expect to rush through the process, slap on a coat of paint and earn a fortune. Professionals understand that buying and selling houses takes time and that the profit margins are sometimes slim.

Bottom line
Before you get involved in flipping houses, do your research. Like any other business venturehttp://images.intellitxt.com/ast/adTypes/2_bing_11pxw.gif, flipping requires time, money, patience and skill, and it will definitely be more difficult than you imagined.